Jed Wesley-Smith

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Principal Engineer at Atlassian, Organiser of ScalaSyd

github.com/jedws
 @jedws

Jed Wesley-Smith is a Principal Engineer and programming philosopher at Atlassian, where he has been widely involved in architecture, performance and concurrency. Jed came to functional programming as a general solution to writing concurrent code. He is interested in techniques that minimise the potential and eliminate the possibility of errors in software. Jed is deeply appreciative of the irony of being called “academic” despite having no formal training whatsoever.

YOW! 2013 Sydney

Industrial Experiences Transitioning to Functional Programming
FUNCTIONAL

This talk covers 3 different functional programmers’ experiences applying Functional Programming in industrial settings; A product company improving their process and success, a new team with new projects, and a team performing experiments with multiple implementations using FP and non-FP languages. There have been some impressive results, and some interesting challenges. We hope these stories inform and inspire you if you are interested in adoption FP in your organisation.

Team 1: A new project, and a new team, is theoretically an ideal time to start using functional programming – green fields. Michael had to good fortune to be a co-founding engineer where the teams were built from the grown up, and projects split off organically. Hyper-small teams (1 or 2 people) and FP (Scala and Erlang, mainly) with the so-called micro-services approach allowed this to work – and scale reasonably well as teams grew. There have been trade offs, but using FP has enabled a breadth of features to be implemented via very small teams. Michael will talk about these trade offs and benefits as his portion of the talk

Team 2: ThoughtWorks has been engaged by IOOF to assist them in building superannuation integration solutions. Korny will talk about how ThoughtWorks and IOOF ran an initial three week experiment to evaluate functional programming languages, using a range of objective and subjective metrics. Based on the results of that experiment, the team developed their integration system in Clojure – Korny will also talk about how the adoption went, and how Clojure was a key factor that allowed them to meet tight deadlines in spite of multiple requirement changes.

Team 3: Atlassian products have to run in all manner of environments, with tens of thousands of customers running every possible combination of hardware, OS, DB and more. Functional programming techniques have proved useful to tame the complexity, and now serious FP projects are underway and gaining momentum. Jed relates the challenges, the pitfalls and the successes that have come with introducing FP to Atlassian.

One of the scenarios described is likely to apply to you – we hope you can take this experience back to your organisation and look at ways you can introduce functional programming based on these lessons learned.

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