James Lewis

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Principal Consultant at ThoughtWorks, Coding Architect on Microservices
 bovon.org/
 @boicy

James studied Astrophysics in the 90’s but got sick of programming in Fortran. As a member of the ThoughtWorks Technical Advisory Board, the group that creates the Technology Radar, he contributes to industry adoption of open source and other tools, techniques, platforms and languages. For the last few years he has been working as a coding architect on projects built using microservices; exploring new patterns and ways of working as he goes.

James has spoken at a number of UK and international conferences. His previous topics range from domain driven design, SOA and the future of the web to agile adoption patterns and lean thinking. He’s also heavily involved in the fledgling microservice community. He rather likes the fact that he got to describe his take on things jointly with Martin Fowler in an article that is influencing how people see the future of software architecture.

YOW! 2015 Sydney

Microservices – Building Software that is #neverdone

TALK –  VIEW SLIDES

The software industry is changing faster than ever. Now, with microservices becoming more and more accepted as an approach to systems architecture, the rate of change of our industry and of the software we write is getting faster and faster.

In this talk, James explores what this means for developers writing code now. Do we abandon our quest to build quality in? What does it mean for design if we are building software explicitly to throw it away a short time later. Is TDD dead? What does software craftsmanship look like through the lens of replaceable code in small replaceable services?

In short, what does it mean if we are #neverdone?


Design & Implementation of Microservices

WORKSHOP

Microservices Architecture is a concept that aims to decouple a solution by decomposing functionality into discrete services. Microservice architectures can lead to easier to change, more maintainable systems which can be more secure, performant and stable.

In this workshop you will discover a consistent and reinforcing set of tools and practices rooted in the philosophy of small and simple that can help you move towards a Microservice architecture in your own organisation. Small services, communicating via the web’s uniform interface with single responsibilities and installed as well behaved operating system services. However, with these finer-grained systems come new sources of complexity.